Valistunut anarkismi: kansainvälinen konferenssi Lapin yliopistossa

Valistunut anarkismi: kansainvälinen konferenssi Lapin yliopistossa

11-14 syyskuuta, 2014, LS 10

 

Järjestäjät:

Ali Jones, CIMO Fellow, Cambridgen yliopisto

Mika Luoma-aho, Lapin yliopisto

 

Occupy-liike ja arabikevät ovat esimerkkejä maailmanpoliittisista tapahtumista, joiden taustalla kaikuu anarkismin aate. Yleisessä mielipiteessä anarkismiin liitetään lähinnä negatiivisia piirteitä – kaaosta, väkivaltaa ja tuhoa – mutta pinnan alla on tätä paljon nyansoidumpi ideologia. Tänä päivänä anarkismi nousee esimerkiksi autoritäärisiä liikkeitä, julkisen vallan korruptoituneisuutta, uusliberalismia ja globalisaation voimia vastaan. Voimme tulkita anarkismia myös niin, että sen avulla korostamme ja kirkastamme demokratian ihanteita. Vuonna 2012 Saul Newman kirjoitti, että ideologinen maaperämme on muuttunut siten, että radikalismi tarkoittaakin nykyään tinkimättömyyttä laillisuusperiaatteesta, kansalaisoikeuksista ja ihmisoikeuksista. Vaikka aikalaiskeskustelussa anarkismilla on omat ongelmalliset merkityksensä, anarkistit ovat yhteiskunnasta kiinnostuneita ja poliittisesti aktiivisia kansalaisia. Tämä herättää kysymyksen siitä miksi anarkisteja pidetään yhteiskunnallisena uhkana? Mikä on anarkismin ja demokratian periaatteiden ja arvojen suhde toisiinsa?

 

Valistunut anarkismi-konferenssi on lähtölaukaus anarkismia koskevalle keskustelulle Suomessa. Konferenssi järjestetään yhteistyössä Lapin yliopiston ja Cambridgen yliopiston kanssa.

Yli kaksikymmentä kansainvälistä vierasta osallistuu konferenssiin, heidän muassaan keynote-vieraat tohtori George Katsiaficas (Wentworth Institute of Technology) and tohtori Alexandre Christoyannopoulos (Loughboroughin yliopisto). Heidän lisäkseen konferenssiin osallistuu myös Dimitrios Roussopoulous. Konferenssin aikataulun ja lisätietoja löytyy osoitteesta https://enlightenedanarchism.wordpress.com/.

 

Konferenssin tilaisuudet ovat avoimia ja rohkaisemme erityisesti oiskelijoita osallistumaan. Kurssin opintojen korvaavuksia voi tiedustella mika.luoma-aho@ulapland.fi

Conference Schedule

Enlightened Anarchism
September 11-14, 2014
Lapland University, in cooperation with Cambridge University
Location: Lapin Yliopisto, Room LS10, Rovaniemi Finland

Keynote Speakers:
George Katsiaficas
Alexandre Christoyannopoulos

Special Guest Speaker:
Dimitrios Roussopoulos

Thursday September 11th

18:00 Dinner hosted by Prof. Dr. Mauri Ylä-Kotola, Lapland University Rector, (Location TBA)

Friday September 12th

8:30-9:15 Registration, Coffee, warm snacks and pastries

9:15-9:30 Welcoming Remarks, Ali Jones

9:30- 11:00 Non-Western Anarchisms
Chair: Dimitri Roussopoulos

Tiina Seppälä, University of Lapland – Anarchism, Resistance & Social Movements: Critical Perspectives from South Asia
Enrique Galvan-Alvarez, International University of La Rioja – Revolutionary Mercy? The Western Buddhist Anarchist Tradition
James Jackson, Unaffiliated – Rebel Music

11:00-11:15 Break

11:15 – 13:15 Capitalism and the State
Chair: Julian Reid

Blair Taylor, New School for Social Research- New Spirit of Capitalism, New Spirit of the Left: Neoanarchism from the Alterglobalization Movement to Occupy Wall Street
Nina Rismal, Cambridge University – Critical Theory and the Question of Violence: The 1968 Students Protests
Brandon Wallace, New School for Social Research – Anarchism and the Legitimation of Authority
Joshua Anderson, Saint Louis University – Against the Nation-State: On the normative poverty of statism

13:15-14:00 Lunch (University Cafeteria)

14:00- 15:30 Anarchism and International Relations
Chair: Mika Luoma-aho

Michael Kilburn, Endicott College – Anarchism and Human Rights
Jan Hanska, Finnish Defense Research Institute – SERIOUSLY LUDICROUS:
The “ridico-anarchic” nature of the politics of the Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army
Guido Verstraeten, Satakunta University of Applied Sciences- Eco-Regionalism, an Alternative for Democratic Anarchistic Refuges.

15:30-16:00 Break (Coffee and warm snacks provided)

16:00– 18:00 George Katsiaficas Keynote, The Grammar of Insurgency

18:15 Board Bus at University to Forest Cookout.
(Food will be provided. Please bring drinks, warm clothes, and rain coats as appropriate)

Saturday September 13th

9:00-9:30 Coffee, warm snacks and pastries

9:30- 11:00 Anarchisms in German Thought and Praxis
Chair: George Katsiaficas

Anatole Lucet, École normale supérieure de Lyon – Spirit and community: Gustav Landauer’s criticisms of materialism and violence.
Katharina Karcher, University of Warwick and Cambridge University – The Red Zora: Anarchist Feminist Counter-violence in the Federal Republic of Germany
Ali Jones, Cambridge University – Henri Lefebvre and German Autonomie

11:00-11:15 Break

11:15-13:15 Freedom, Ethics and The Spirit of Rebellion
Chair: Suvi Alt

Aylon Assael Cohen, Oxford University – The Insurrection of Feelings and the Feelings for Insurrection
Mari Kuukkanen, University of Helsinki – Prefigurative politics or counter-conduct?
Victor Castro, Universidad de Granada – Paradox of Ends and Means
Iwona Janicka, Cambridge University – Is There an Anarchist in this Closet? Understanding Contemporary Anarchism with Judith Butler and Peter Sloterdijk

13:15- 14:00 Lunch (University Cafeteria)

14:00- 15:30 Space and the Spatial Turn
Chair: Ali Jones

Mika Luoma-aho, Lapland University – Metaethics of Scale
Rui Coelho, University of Lisbon – Anarcho-Monks: Is Neomonasticism part of the “New Anarchist” wave?
Christian Pfenninger, University of Westminster – Porous Sovereignties

15:30-15:45 Break

15:45- 17:15 Anarchism and Christian Theology
Chair: Alexandre Christoyannopoulos

Anthony Fiscella, Lund University – Two Christianities: “Communal” and “Imperial” Variations – Responsibilities and Relevancies for Researchers
Lara Apps, University of Alberta, No Gods, No Masters? Anarchic Optimism in Eighteenth-Century French Atheism
Justin Meggitt, Cambridge University – Anarchism and Apocalypse: The historical Jesus and the problem of violence deferred

17:15-18:00 Break (coffee and warm snacks provided)

18:00- 20:00 Alexandre Christoyannopoulos Keynote, Leo Tolstoy’s Anticlericalism

20:00 University Sauna.
(Drinks and snacks will be provided. Meals can be ordered).

Sunday September 14th
Location: University Sauna Meeting Room

10:00-11:00 Roundtable Discussion (Coffee, snacks, pastries provided)
Dennis Fox, Emeritus, University of Illinois at Springfield – Anarchist Morality and Personal Change

11:00-13:00 Dimitrios Roussopoulos Special Guest Speaker,
Constructive Anarchism – Social Ecology and Democracy

13:00 Conference Conclusion.

Press Release: Conference Announcement

Enlightened Anarchism: An International Conference at Lapland University

Sept 11-14, 2014, Lapin Yliopisto, LS 10

Organized by:

Ms. Ali Jones, CIMO Fellow, Cambridge University

Dr. Mika Luoma-aho, Lapland University

 

Anarchism has recently become a topic of scholarly focus, as social and political movements such as Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring have emerged throughout the world. While traditional public opinion tends to view anarchism as juvenile force of negation, violence or gleeful destruction, it is nonetheless possible to examine a far more nuanced discourse, as espoused by the social actors involved. In fact, many such groups are particularly focused upon combating fascism, perceived state corruption, the effects of neoliberalism or globalization, or to dedicating themselves to fighting for environmental protection, immigrant and refugee rights, or in other arena of social justice. Many of these aims could be interpreted as not only in the public interest, but also to constitute some of the cornerstones of democracy itself. In fact, in 2012 Saul Newman wrote that “the ideological terrain appears to have shifted to such an extent that to be radical these days is precisely to insist on things like the rule of law and protection of civil liberties and human rights.” Indeed, despite the traditional perceptions of anarchy predominant in Finnish academia, it is in fact possible to view these social movements as composed of highly engaged, and even faithful, public citizens, which begs the question of why they are ostracized and considered to be so politically threatening. It further causes one to re-examine democracy and Anarchism categorically and philosophically.

 

The upcoming Enlightened Anarchism conference seeks to initiate this important conversation within the Finnish Academy. It is organized in organized in cooperation with Cambridge University, with financial supported from the Lapland Faculty of Social Sciences. This major international event will host 25 speakers from around the world, including two outstanding keynotes: Dr. George Katsiaficas, Wentworth Institute of Technology and Dr. Alexandre Christoyannopoulos, Loughborough University, in addition to Special Guest Speaker Dimitrios Roussopoulous. Biographies of each speaker can be found online, along with the schedule of talks, at https://enlightenedanarchism.wordpress.com/.

 

All events are open to the public, and we encourage students to attend and participate. Students seeking credit for participation should contact Dr. Mika Luoma-aho at mika.luoma-aho@ulapland.fi.

 

 

Keynote Speaker Biographies

George Katsiaficas has been active in social movements since 1969. A target of the FBI’s COINTELPRO program, he was classified “Priority 1 ADEX” (meaning in the event of a national emergency, people like him were to be immediately arrested). For 11 years, he worked in Ocean Beach, California as part of a radical countercultural community (described in Andre Gorz’s book, Ecology as Politics). He moved to Berlin, after which he wrote two books: one on the global imagination of 1968 and another on European social movements. In these books, he developed the concept of the “eros effect” to name the sudden and synchronous eruption of insurgencies. For years, he was active in the cause of Palestinian rights. Together with Kathleen Cleaver, he co-edited Liberation, Imagination and the Black Panther Party. A graduate of MIT and UCSD (where he studied with Herbert Marcuse), he is currently based at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and also in Gwangju, South Korea, where he finished a 2-volume book, Asia’s Unknown Uprisings. His web site is: http://www.eroseffect.com

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Loughborough University, which he joined in 2010.

He is the author of Christian Anarchism: A Political Commentary on the Gospel, a seminal book which brings together the writings of disparate Christian anarchists, Tolstoy in particular, and presents a comprehensive exegesis arguing that Jesus’ teaching implies anarchism. He has also published a number of articles, chapters and other publications on Tolstoy and on Christian anarchism, and edited Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives. He is currently working on a monograph on Tolstoy’s political thought, and co-editing a new collection of essays on anarchism and religion.

A Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, he also acts as Treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network and officer of the International Political Science Association’s research committee on Politics and Religion.

His website, which includes a full list of publications (many of which are openly accessible online) and a more extensive biography, can be accessed via http://www.christoyannopoulos.com.

Special Guest Speaker Dimitrios Roussopoulos is a public intellectual, and is not affiliated to any specific university.  He has been active in democratic movements since 1968, and his extensive biography can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimitrios_Roussopoulos.

 

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED to JUNE 15

Please note the extended deadline of June 15 for abstract submission.

 

Call for Papers: Enlightened Anarchism

 An inter-disciplinary event organized by Lapland University, in cooperation with Cambridge University.

 

Keynote Speakers:

George Katsiaficas, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos, Loughborough University

With Special Guest Speaker:

Dimitrios Roussopoulous

 

Lapland University, Rovaniemi Finland

Sept 12-14, 2014

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words, including email address and institutional affiliation, to conference organizers Ali Jones at ajones@ulapland.fi and Mika Luoma-aho at mika.luoma-aho@ulapland.fi by Extended deadline of June 15, 2014.  

Please also see our website at: https://enlightenedanarchism.wordpress.com/

 

Anarchism has recently become a topic of scholarly focus, as social and political movements have become increasingly active across Europe and North America. While traditional public opinion tends to view anarchism as juvenile force of negation, violence or gleeful destruction, it is nonetheless possible to examine a far more nuanced discourse, as espoused by the social actors involved. In fact, many such groups are particularly focused upon combatting fascism, perceived state corruption, the effects of neoliberalism or globalization, or to dedicating themselves to fighting for environmental protection, immigrant and refugee rights, or in other arena of social justice. Many of these aims could be interpreted as not only in the public interest, but also to constitute some of the cornerstones of democracy itself.  Indeed, despite the traditionally discussed perceptions of anarchy, it is in fact possible to view these social movements as highly engaged public citizens, which begs the question of why they are ostracized and considered to be so politically threatening. It further causes one to re-examine democracy and anarchy categorically and philosophically.

 

This reconsideration further raises the debate surrounding the use of political violence for achieving democratic goals. This conference particularly wishes to open dialogue on these discourses, especially the moral, and one could even say spiritual aims of such movements. 

Furthermore, analysis and recent scholarship also asks whether anarchism must be “justified” by such moral categories, or if it should attempt to remove itself from such dominating discourses. As such, both moral and anti-moral interpretations are welcome, as well as those papers interrogating this process of moral justification itself.

 

Focusing upon this notion of enlightened anarchism, the conference presents a forum for discussing the moral, anti-moral, religious, anti-religious, social justice, democratic and anti-democratic, or purely revolutionary discourses of modern anarchists and social movements.

 

The conference organizers are particularly interested in placing these contrasting perspectives into fruitful and exciting conversation. Some potential areas of focus include:

 

-Enlightened anarchism

-Political theology and social movements

-The use of anarchism to achieve the goals of democracy

-The use of anarchy to combat perceived corruption

-The justification of destruction for purposes of social justice

-Discussions of anarchist violence

-The justification of violence for achieving democratic or moral goals

-A re-examination of democracy and anarchism

-Explicitly religious anarchism

-Explicitly anti-religious anarchism

-Anarchism as a non-religious morality

-Anarchism rejecting the category of morality

-Other types of anarchism

– While papers on Marxism will of course be considered, the conference organizers hope that they will relate to anarchism in some way.

 

Selected papers from the conference will then be compiled into an edited volume, and submitted to Cambridge University Press or another international publisher by the end of 2014.

 

While travel funding is unfortunately not possible, limited subsidized accommodations are available. Presenters are encouraged to contact conference organizers Ali Jones at ajones@ulapland.fi and Mika Luoma-aho at mika.luoma-aho@ulapland.fi with inquiries.

 

Keynote Speaker Biographies

George Katsiaficas has been active in social movements since 1969. A target of the FBI’s COINTELPRO program, he was classified “Priority 1 ADEX” (meaning in the event of a national emergency, people like him were to be immediately arrested). For 11 years, he worked in Ocean Beach, California as part of a radical countercultural community (described in Andre Gorz’s book, Ecology as Politics). He moved to Berlin, after which he wrote two books: one on the global imagination of 1968 and another on European social movements. In these books, he developed the concept of the “eros effect” to name the sudden and synchronous eruption of insurgencies. For years, he was active in the cause of Palestinian rights. Together with Kathleen Cleaver, he co-edited Liberation, Imagination and the Black Panther Party. A graduate of MIT and UCSD (where he studied with Herbert Marcuse), he is currently based at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and also in Gwangju, South Korea, where he finished a 2-volume book, Asia’s Unknown Uprisings.  His web site is: http://www.eroseffect.com

 

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Loughborough University, which he joined in 2010.

He is the author of Christian Anarchism: A Political Commentary on the Gospel, a seminal book which brings together the writings of disparate Christian anarchists, Tolstoy in particular, and presents a comprehensive exegesis arguing that Jesus’ teaching implies anarchism. He has also published a number of articles, chapters and other publications on Tolstoy and on Christian anarchism, and edited Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives. He is currently working on a monograph on Tolstoy’s political thought, and co-editing a new collection of essays on anarchism and religion.

A Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, he also acts as Treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network and officer of the International Political Science Association’s research committee on Politics and Religion.

His website, which includes a full list of publications (many of which are openly accessible online) and a more extensive biography, can be accessed via http://www.christoyannopoulos.com.

Call for Papers: Enlightened Anarchism

An inter-disciplinary event organized by Lapland University, in cooperation with Cambridge University.

 

Keynote Speakers:

George Katsiaficas, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos, Loughborough University

With Special Guest Speaker:

Dimitrios Roussopoulous

(Speaker biographies at end of this call.)

 

Lapland University, Rovaniemi Finland

Sept 12-14, 2014

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words, including email address and institutional affiliation, to conference organizers Ali Jones at ajones@ulapland.fi and Mika Luoma-aho at mika.luoma-aho@ulapland.fi by June 1, 2014.

Please also see our website at: https://enlightenedanarchism.wordpress.com/

 

Anarchism has recently become a topic of scholarly focus, as social and political movements have become increasingly active across Europe and North America. While traditional public opinion tends to view anarchism as juvenile force of negation, violence or gleeful destruction, it is nonetheless possible to examine a far more nuanced discourse, as espoused by the social actors involved. In fact, many such groups are particularly focused upon combatting fascism, perceived state corruption, the effects of neoliberalism or globalization, or to dedicating themselves to fighting for environmental protection, immigrant and refugee rights, or in other arena of social justice. Many of these aims could be interpreted as not only in the public interest, but also to constitute some of the cornerstones of democracy itself. Indeed, despite the traditionally discussed perceptions of anarchy, it is in fact possible to view these social movements as highly engaged public citizens, which begs the question of why they are ostracized and considered to be so politically threatening. It further causes one to re-examine democracy and anarchy categorically and philosophically.

 

This reconsideration further raises the debate surrounding the use of political violence for achieving democratic goals. This conference particularly wishes to open dialogue on these discourses, especially the moral, and one could even say spiritual aims of such movements.

Furthermore, analysis and recent scholarship also asks whether anarchism must be “justified” by such moral categories, or if it should attempt to remove itself from such dominating discourses. As such, both moral and anti-moral interpretations are welcome, as well as those papers interrogating this process of moral justification itself.

 

Focusing upon this notion of enlightened anarchism, the conference presents a forum for discussing the moral, anti-moral, religious, anti-religious, social justice, democratic and anti-democratic, or purely revolutionary discourses of modern anarchists and social movements.

 

The conference organizers are particularly interested in placing these contrasting perspectives into fruitful and exciting conversation. Some potential areas of focus include:

 

-Enlightened anarchism

-Political theology and social movements

-The use of anarchism to achieve the goals of democracy

-The use of anarchy to combat perceived corruption

-The justification of destruction for purposes of social justice

-Discussions of anarchist violence

-The justification of violence for achieving democratic or moral goals

-A re-examination of democracy and anarchism

-Explicitly religious anarchism

-Explicitly anti-religious anarchism

-Anarchism as a non-religious morality

-Anarchism rejecting the category of morality

-Other types of anarchism

– While papers on Marxism will of course be considered, the conference organizers hope that they will relate to anarchism in some way.

 

Selected papers from the conference will then be compiled into an edited volume, and submitted to Cambridge University Press or another international publisher by the end of 2014.

 

While travel funding is unfortunately not possible, limited subsidized accommodations are available. Presenters are encouraged to contact conference organizers Ali Jones at ajones@ulapland.fi and Mika Luoma-aho at mika.luoma-aho@ulapland.fi with inquiries.

 

Keynote Speaker Biographies

George Katsiaficas has been active in social movements since 1969. A target of the FBI’s COINTELPRO program, he was classified “Priority 1 ADEX” (meaning in the event of a national emergency, people like him were to be immediately arrested). For 11 years, he worked in Ocean Beach, California as part of a radical countercultural community (described in Andre Gorz’s book, Ecology as Politics). He moved to Berlin, after which he wrote two books: one on the global imagination of 1968 and another on European social movements. In these books, he developed the concept of the “eros effect” to name the sudden and synchronous eruption of insurgencies. For years, he was active in the cause of Palestinian rights. Together with Kathleen Cleaver, he co-edited Liberation, Imagination and the Black Panther Party. A graduate of MIT and UCSD (where he studied with Herbert Marcuse), he is currently based at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston and also in Gwangju, South Korea, where he finished a 2-volume book, Asia’s Unknown Uprisings. His web site is: http://www.eroseffect.com

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Loughborough University, which he joined in 2010.

He is the author of Christian Anarchism: A Political Commentary on the Gospel, a seminal book which brings together the writings of disparate Christian anarchists, Tolstoy in particular, and presents a comprehensive exegesis arguing that Jesus’ teaching implies anarchism. He has also published a number of articles, chapters and other publications on Tolstoy and on Christian anarchism, and edited Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives. He is currently working on a monograph on Tolstoy’s political thought, and co-editing a new collection of essays on anarchism and religion.

A Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, he also acts as Treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network and officer of the International Political Science Association’s research committee on Politics and Religion.

His website, which includes a full list of publications (many of which are openly accessible online) and a more extensive biography, can be accessed via http://www.christoyannopoulos.com.